Astronomy History

Astronomy History


Answer by Molly Sophia Emily
A classic division of astronomy is given by the area of the electromagnetic spectrum observed:

Optical astronomy is the element of astronomy that utilizes optical elements (mirrors, lenses, CCD detectors and photographic films) to observe light from near infrared to close to ultraviolet wavelengths. Visible light astronomy (making use of wavelengths that can be detected with the eyes, about 400 – 700 nm) falls in the middle of this variety. The most frequent tool is the telescope, with electronic imagers and spectrographs.
Infrared astronomy deals with the detection and evaluation of infrared radiation (wavelengths longer than red light). The most frequent tool is the telescope but employing a detector which is sensitive to the infrared. Space telescopes are also utilised to stay away from atmospheric thermal emission, atmospheric opacity, and the effects of astronomical seeing at infrared and other wavelengths.
Radio astronomy detects radiation of millimetre to dekametre wavelength. The radio telescope receivers are similar to these utilised in radio broadcast transmission but considerably more sensitive.
High-power astronomy includes X-ray astronomy, gamma ray astronomy, and extreme UV (ultraviolet) astronomy, as effectively as research of neutrinos and cosmic rays.

Astronomy History

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